Criminology

Curriculum Intent

  • To develop upon students’ knowledge of crime and to provide a holistic understanding of the interconnected nature of the different types of crimes, from such concepts as why crimes go unreported to understanding the processes of the UK legal system.
  • To equip students with an array of critical skills and to develop an analytical mindset, providing life-long skills beyond education.
  • To apply real life criminal cases to different contexts and apply knowledge and understanding as to why crimes go unreported, the theories behind criminality, and the UK legal system.
  • To give students opportunities to think like criminologist, enabling them to think and evaluate the effectiveness of policies, law and techniques used within the UK.
  • To enable students to reflect on their strengths and areas for development in their writing and to actively improve their work.
  • To incorporate a variety of thinking maps, thinking hats and thinkers’ keys into everyday learning within criminology.
  • Develop their interest and enthusiasm for the subject, including developing an interest in further study and careers associated with the subject, via examining essential career pathways related to criminology.

In Year 12 students will look at the impact of changing awareness of different types of crimes on the theories around criminality.

  • Unit 1 covers why crimes such as white-collar crimes, moral crimes and technological crimes, to name a few, go unreported. Students will look at the reasons for those crimes going unreported and the impact of unreported crimes. Then they will analyse the media impact of crime and how it is represented, helping students to understand the effectiveness of unreported crime campaigns. Students will then be required to make a campaign for change in their assessment. The unit will be internally assessed in year 12.
  • Unit 2 covers the theories behind criminality from biological theories to sociological theories of criminality. Students will need to understand each theory of criminality, evaluate the effectiveness of each theory and the policies of crime control that come from each theory. This will be externally assessed in year 12.

Year 12

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

Unit 1 Changing awareness of crime

LO1 - Understand how crime reporting affects the public perception of criminality

 

Unit 2 Criminological theories

LO1 – understand social construction of criminality

Unit 1 Changing awareness of crime

LO2 – Understand how campaigns are used to elicit change

 

Unit 2 Criminological Theories

LO2 - Know theories of criminality

L03 – understand causes of criminality

Unit 1  Changing awareness of crime

L03 – Plan campaigns for change relating to crime

 

Controlled Assessment

Unit 3 Crime Scene to Courtroom

Prison Project

 

Unit 2 Criminological Theories

LO3 - understand causes of criminality

L04 – Understand causes of policy change

Revision for Unit 2 external exam

Unit 3 Crime Scene to Courtroom

Prison Project

 

Unit 4 Introduction to Crime and Punishment

LO1 – Understand the criminal justice system in England and Wales

 


In year 13 students will look at the effectiveness of the process of the crime scene to courtroom of a crime, as well as understanding how the criminal justice system works in the UK.

  • Unit 3 covers the process of a crime scene to court room. Students will investigate different techniques, methods and personnel used in a crime scene and evaluate the effectiveness and usefulness of these roles at the crime scene. Each section will be applied to real life cases within the media to support this evaluation. This unit will be internally assessed in year 13.
  • Unit 4 covers the criminal justice system within the UK. This unit will investigate how laws are made, the causes of policy change and why some changes to laws and policies are needed. This section will apply real life cases and laws to each part of the unit. This will be externally assessed in year 13.

Year 13

Term 1

Term 2

Term 3

Term 4

Term 5

Term 6

Unit 3 Crime scene to courtroom

LO1 –  Understand the process of criminal investigations

 

Unit 4 Crime and Punishment

LO1 –  Understand the criminal justice system in England and Wales

Unit 3 Crime Scene to Courtroom

LO2 – Understand the process for persecution of suspects

 

Unit 4 Crime and Punishment

L02  Understand the role of punishment in the criminal justice system

Unit 3 Crime Scene to Courtroom LO3 - be able to review criminal cases

Controlled Assessment

 

Unit 4 Crime and Punishment

LO3 -Understand measures used in social control

Unit 4 Crime and Punishment

L03 – Understand measures used in social control

Examinations

Examinations

How will you be assessed?

Unit 1: Changing awareness of crime

The following unit will be internally assessed:

  • 8 hours internal assessment which is covered over two days
  • 3 hours of the coursework will not require the internet
  • 5 hours of the coursework will require the internet
  • Students will be given a brief of different types of crimes given and are expected to apply their knowledge of the awareness of crime to the brief
  • Extended answer questions based on stimulus material and applied contexts will be required
  • Students will be required to answer all of the questions provided and make a campaign for change as part of the assessment.

Unit 2: Criminological theories

The following unit will be externally assessed:

  • 90-minute examination
  • Total of 75 marks
  • Three sections on the paper
  • Short and extended answer questions, based on stimulus material and applied contexts
  • Each question will have an applied problem-solving scenario

Unit 3: Crime scene to court

The following unit will be internally assessed:

  • 8 hours internal assessment which is covered over two days
  • No internet access for the full 8 hours
  • Students will be given a brief of a crime scene case which they are required to apply their knowledge to
  • Students will have extended writing questions based on stimulus material and applied contexts
  • Students will be required to answer all of the questions.

Unit 4: Crime and Punishment

The following unit will be externally assessed:

  • 90-minute examination
  • Total of 75 marks
  • Three sections on the paper
  • Short and extended answer questions, based on stimulus material and applied contexts
  • Each question will have an applied problem-solving scenario

 

Careers

By studying criminology students are able to make informed decisions about potential future career paths. Criminology is a beneficial course to study at a sixth form level and beyond, it provides valuable skills needed for future careers and will help you progress into subjects such as education, psychology, sociology, media, law as well as criminology itself. Criminology students have numerous different career options available to them. Exciting roles include education, law enforcement, people protection, community planning, advocacy, policing, consulting, public administration, and international development.

https://www.ucas.com/explore/subjects/criminology

 

Useful websites:

http://criminal-justice.iresearchnet.com/http://criminal-justice.iresearchnet.com/

https://www.ucas.com/explore/subjects/criminology

https://criminology.uk.net/

https://www.wjec.co.uk/qualifications/criminology-level-3/#tab_keydocuments

 

British Values

The Holcombe Criminology department promotes British values in a variety of ways, such as applying a wide range of applied examples of real-life crimes within the UK which promote in empathy and understanding, tolerance and respect within our students. Due to the sensitive nature of some topics within criminology, our students are all given the opportunity to develop on their abilities to discuss various perspectives and ideas within a safe and respectful environment that promotes communication, respect and empathy. As part of the diploma in criminology students develop an understanding of the legal system, how laws are made and the need to change laws and apply this knowledge to the key principles of British values. As a department we give students the opportunity to experience the importance of decision making by exploring and considering different opinions and how voices are heard. By giving the opportunity to study criminology students are able to develop their preconceived understanding of crime and to develop self-reflective skills to challenge new ideas.