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Coronavirus Updates

Further information about how our Trust and schools are taking necessary precautions since the outbreak of the Coronavirus, can be found in our Trust’s ‘Coronavirus (COVID-19) website section’.

For responses to our National Writing Day #247challenge, please see here.

Students joining us in Year 12 September 2020: please see a page of resources for you here. 

Update 11.06.20: For an update about remote learning, to Years 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12, please see here.

Update 08.06.20: Year 10 and 12 parents and carers, please see the letter that has been sent out with your student’s bubbles. For FAQs, please see here.

Live Learning Timetables: Please see here for live learning timetables for this term for Years 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12.


For any key worker whose child is not currently using our childcare facility, and who subsequently becomes unable to provide childcare at home –  you must give the school 24 hours’ notice that you need to use this provision so that we can provide appropriate staffing. This means emailing r.martin@tsatrust.org.uk or calling 03333 602130 by 9am the day before. For Monday provision, please ensure that you contact the school by 9am on the preceding Friday.  Students arriving without giving 24 hours’ notice may be turned away if we do not have adequate staffing. To access this provision, you must also have downloaded and completed the form that can be found here and you must bring it with you to the school when you arrive.

You can access Holcombe Grammar School’s COVID-19 latest update and archived letters for the whole school and year groups, including links to resources at https://www.holcombegrammar.org.uk/support-guidance/holcombe-covid-19-update/

English Literature and Climate Change Webinar with Aberystwyth University

English Literature and Climate Change Webinar with Aberystwyth University

Year 11, 12 and 13 Literature students took part in a webinar on English Literature and Climate Change run by Aberystwyth University.

Their belief is that climate change “isn’t just a challenge for scientists” so they have developed a wide range of Climate Change-related degrees across diverse subject areas, spanning the Arts/Humanities and the Sciences. It was billed as ‘a great event’ and it did not disappoint.

Dr Neal Alexander took them through discussion exercises and Q&A, exploring how writers imagine climate change, the language and politics of climate change and also literature and the Anthropocene.  Debates initially stemmed from Indian writer Amitav Ghosh’s text, ‘The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable’ and the quotation, “Let us make no mistake: the climate crisis is also a crisis of culture, and thus of the imagination.”   Your preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the pageYour preferences have prevented this content from being loaded. If you have recently changed your preferences, please try reloading the page

Students were asked to consider difficult questions such as ‘What can the literature of the past tell us about our present conditions?’ and ‘Is only contemporary literature concerned with climate change?’  They were treated to extracts from some extremely moving literature: Sarah Hall’s ‘The Carhullan Army’, Ben Okri’s ‘What the Tapster Saw’ and Jesmyn Ward’s ‘Salvage the Bones’ in order stimulate their arguments.  However, it was Stephen Collis’s ‘Reading Wordsworth in the Tar Sands’ which had the most powerful reaction from the students and you can see why:

 

‘Reading Wordsworth in the Tar Sands’

Up north where woods

Are wet and moosey

Except not here not

 

A single green thing

In sight the site like

An abandoned beehive

 

Broken open its grey

Papery layers scattered

Around on the ground

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The Syncrude oil sands plant is seen north of Fort McMurray, Alberta.

Matthew Jupp of Year 11 (a prospective English Literature A Level student for next year) said that he “found it interesting to hear the perspectives of students and the lecturer alike. I made a note of several of the authors the lecturer mentioned and I look forward to doing a bit of research into them”.

Previous Deputy Head Boy, Elliott Odom, who is going to study Geography next year at Bristol University stated that “The debate on whether writers who speculate about the effects of climate change do more harm than good due to the generosity of artistic license was also interesting. In my experience, I think that speculative fiction does have a key role to play in asking questions as to our personal and political decisions. Even though they concern different issues from climate change, books like Noughts & Crosses and 1984 have made me more self-aware of my personal behaviour and ideological position.”

Though the webinar was only an hour long, it was packed full of intellect and certainly gave all who took part a taste of their futures as university students.  If you missed out this time, don’t worry.  More webinars run by a range of universities are on their way!